Ed DeVos - Episode 72

December 12, 2018

Dr. Curtis Rogers discusses Revenge at King's Mountain with author Ed DeVos. Mr. DeVos is a highly decorated military officer and is also an experienced writer of thought-provoking historical fiction. His books, The Stain, The Chaplain's Cross, Revenge at Kings Mountain, and Family of Warriors, feature characters who model valor, integrity, honor, and courage as they face spiritual and moral dilemmas that warriors have always faced on the battlefield.

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Terry Wynne - Episode 70

November 28, 2018

Dr. Curtis Rogers interviews Terry Wynne about her mother's book, Through My Eyes: A Lifetime of Memories-Southern Style. From proud-to-be-Southern storyteller, Carolyne Taylor Wynne’s true tales of her life will charm you with their innocence and entertain you with their humor. Her “laugh at myself” punch lines are page-by-page reminders that the best humor often comes from being oh-so-much less than perfect. Historical, educational, and wholesome, Through My Eyes is a treasured book that families, adults, and children of all ages can read and enjoy together.

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Liz Gilmore Williams - Episode 68

November 14, 2018

Dr. Curtis Rogers discusses No Ordinary Soldier: My father's two wars, with author Liz Gilmore Williams. A finalist in the 2018 International Book Awards in the military history genre, Liz Gilmore Williams worked as a writer and editor for more than 20 years in Washington, D.C., for two offices of the U.S. Congress and other organizations. As a speaker for South Carolina's Humanities Out Loud Program, she travels statewide to speak at meetings for sponsoring organizations that promote discussion about human values, traditions, and cultures. 

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SC Author Leigh Moring Discusses Nathanael Green - Episode 59

August 3, 2018

Dr. Curtis Rogers discusses South Carolina Revolutionary War history with author and educator, Leigh Moring. Moring is the education coordinator for the Historic Charleston Foundation, where she manages K–12 educational programming in historic house museums. She attended Clemson University and received her Bachelor of Arts degree in history with a concentration in museum studies. She went on to pursue her Master of Arts degree in history from the College of Charleston and The Citadel and graduated in May of 2015. She is a presenter at our Speaker @ the Center program and is the author of, Nathanael Greene in South Carolina: Hero of the American Revolution.

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Interview with author Pat McNeely - Episode 57

July 19, 2018

Dr. Curtis Rogers discusses a new book about the Petticoat Affair with South Carolina author, Pat McNeely. Patricia G. "Pat" McNeely is Professor Emerita at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina, where she taught writing and reporting for 33 years in the School of Journalism. Before joining the faculty, she was a reporter and editor for three South Carolina newspapers: the State, the Columbia Record and the Greenville News. She is the author of Andrew Jackson, John C. Calhoun, and the Petticoat Affair. She is the author of many other books including Sherman's Flame and Blame Campaign through Georgia and the Carolinas... and the Burning of Columbia and Palmetto Press: the History of South Carolina's Newspapers

Beautiful and vivacious Margaret "Peggy" O'Neil Timberlake had been widowed only four months in 1829 when she married newly elected President Andrew Jackson's best friend and Secretary of War John Eaton. Horrified by rumors about her dubious reputation, the ladies of Washington, including the wife of Vice President John C. Calhoun, refused to socialize with Peggy Eaton. Enraged by their rejection, the President called a Cabinet meeting to official examine Peggy's character and virtue and to order them to include her in their social lives. When they refused, Jackson stunned the nation in 1831by dissolving his official Cabinet and killing Calhoun's almost certain chance to be the next president. Newspapers and magazines dubbed the crisis the Petticoat Affair. Widowed again in 1856, 59-year-old Peggy Eaton married a 19-year-old Italian dancing instructor and music teacher who spent all her money before he ran off with her 17-year-old granddaughter. The woman who destroyed Jackson's Cabinet and derailed Calhoun's political ambitions died penniless at age 79 in a home for destitute women.

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