SC Author Leigh Moring Discusses Nathanael Green - Episode 59

August 3, 2018

Dr. Curtis Rogers discusses South Carolina Revolutionary War history with author and educator, Leigh Moring. Moring is the education coordinator for the Historic Charleston Foundation, where she manages K–12 educational programming in historic house museums. She attended Clemson University and received her Bachelor of Arts degree in history with a concentration in museum studies. She went on to pursue her Master of Arts degree in history from the College of Charleston and The Citadel and graduated in May of 2015. She is a presenter at our Speaker @ the Center program and is the author of, Nathanael Greene in South Carolina: Hero of the American Revolution.

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Interview with author Pat McNeely - Episode 57

July 19, 2018

Dr. Curtis Rogers discusses a new book about the Petticoat Affair with South Carolina author, Pat McNeely. Patricia G. "Pat" McNeely is Professor Emerita at the University of South Carolina in Columbia, South Carolina, where she taught writing and reporting for 33 years in the School of Journalism. Before joining the faculty, she was a reporter and editor for three South Carolina newspapers: the State, the Columbia Record and the Greenville News. She is the author of Andrew Jackson, John C. Calhoun, and the Petticoat Affair. She is the author of many other books including Sherman's Flame and Blame Campaign through Georgia and the Carolinas... and the Burning of Columbia and Palmetto Press: the History of South Carolina's Newspapers

Beautiful and vivacious Margaret "Peggy" O'Neil Timberlake had been widowed only four months in 1829 when she married newly elected President Andrew Jackson's best friend and Secretary of War John Eaton. Horrified by rumors about her dubious reputation, the ladies of Washington, including the wife of Vice President John C. Calhoun, refused to socialize with Peggy Eaton. Enraged by their rejection, the President called a Cabinet meeting to official examine Peggy's character and virtue and to order them to include her in their social lives. When they refused, Jackson stunned the nation in 1831by dissolving his official Cabinet and killing Calhoun's almost certain chance to be the next president. Newspapers and magazines dubbed the crisis the Petticoat Affair. Widowed again in 1856, 59-year-old Peggy Eaton married a 19-year-old Italian dancing instructor and music teacher who spent all her money before he ran off with her 17-year-old granddaughter. The woman who destroyed Jackson's Cabinet and derailed Calhoun's political ambitions died penniless at age 79 in a home for destitute women.

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All for Civil Rights with W. Lewis Burke - Episode 52

May 30, 2018

Dr. Curtis Rogers discusses All for Civil Rights: African American Lawyers in South Carolina, 1868–1968 with author W. Lewis BurkeBefore joining the USC School of Law faculty, Distinguished Professor Emeritus Burke was a VISTA Volunteer and a legal services attorney. As a clinician, Professor Burke continues represent low income clients. In 2003 he was awarded the “Outstanding Faculty Service Award” for his years of community service including Habitat for Humanity, Appleseed, and his pro bono representation of a death row client. He was an editor of Madam Chief Justice: South Carolina’s Jean Hoefer Toal published by U.S.C. Press in 2015 and is author of All for Civil Rights: African American Lawyers in South Carolina, 1868–1968 which is part of the Southern Legal Studies Series by University of Georgia Press.

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South Carolina History through Poetry with Kimberly Simms - Episode 50

May 8, 2018

Dr. Curtis Rogers discusses South Carolina cotton mill history through the poetry of author Kimberly J. Simms. Kimberly is graduate of Furman and Clemson Universities and her work has appeared in over 30 literary journals including the Asheville Poetry Review and the Broad River Review. She is a Pushcart Prize nominee and her work is included in the South Carolina Poetry Archives at Furman University. She is the proud founder of Wits End Poetry, a non-profit now celebrating 15 years of creating South Carolina poetry events and educational outreach. Kimberly is also a recent participant in our Speaker @ the Center program in March of 2018.

Simms' book, Lindy Lee: Songs on Mill Hill, brings to life the social fault lines of textile mills in the rural South Carolina Piedmont — themes of child labor, the changing roles of women, of a fading away of life where isolation is juxtaposed against a strong sense of community. Part history, part poetry — this collection is peppered with the poignant, rarely seen photography of Lewis Hine (1874 – 1940). With Lindy Lee, Simms finds the vast and profound in the smallest of domestic spaces. In the words of William Wright (2016 Georgia Author of the Year), she celebrates and records in vivid imagery “the joys and hardships of a charged, mythic, and sweat-soaked place.”

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